Survey Results
 
Executive Summary (Download PowerPoint)
   
  The Injection Impact Report Fact Sheet
     
  The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) has just released results from an innovative new survey entitled the “Injection Impact Report” that highlights the level of communication between patients and healthcare providers relating to insulin injections and also spotlights how those injections can impact patients’ daily lives and treatment adherence.  
     
 
 

The survey examined a group of 500 patients who require insulin and showed that:

    One-third (33 percent) of patients identified that they have some level of dread associated with taking their daily injections
Eight percent strongly agree that they dread injections
Twenty-five percent somewhat agree that they dread injections
 
Fourteen percent of individuals surveyed felt that the insulin injections had a negative impact on their life
Three percent experience a major impact
Eleven percent experience a moderate impact
Twenty-nine percent of individuals surveyed felt that injecting insulin was the hardest aspect of their diabetes care
Eight percent strongly agree
Twenty-one percent somewhat agree
Forty-eight percent of individuals surveyed acknowledged proactively communicating with their healthcare team about quality of life issues
Eighteen percent strongly agree
30 percent somewhat agree
Thirty-seven percent of respondents felt that discussing these issues would be a bother to their healthcare provider
Forty-seven percent of patients surveyed said they would be more adherent to their treatment regimen if they knew about a way to ease the pain and discomfort associated with their insulin injections
Twenty percent of people with diabetes have skipped an insulin injection that they
knew they should take sometimes or often (two percent often and 18 percent sometimes) and 43 percent have altered their eating schedule to avoid extra injections
 
The AADE also looked at 300 healthcare providers, including physicians and diabetes educators, and found that:
    Of the 300 healthcare providers surveyed, only 12 percent have had patients address their quality of life concerns relating to insulin injections either often (one percent) or sometimes (11 percent)
    Forty percent of healthcare providers surveyed have initiated a dialogue with their patients on quality of life issues related to insulin injection. However, only 21 percent of their patients report their healthcare professional asks them about the impact of needle sticks sometimes or often
    Seventy-one percent of healthcare providers surveyed feel that their patients experience anxiety either often (14 percent) or sometimes (56 percent)
    Sixty-seven percent of healthcare providers surveyed feel that their patients experience bruising either often (14 percent) or sometimes (54 percent)
    Sixty-two percent of healthcare providers surveyed feel that their patients experience pain either often (9 percent) or sometimes (53 percent)
    Seventy-nine percent of healthcare providers surveyed felt that their patients skip insulin injections they know they should take either often (13 percent) or sometimes (67 percent)
    Seventy-three percent of healthcare providers feel that their patients alter their eating schedule to avoid insulin injections
 
     
 
About the Surveys
 
 
The surveys were conducted online within the United States by Harris Interactive on behalf of the American Association of Diabetes Educators between June 12th and July 7th, 2008. The survey of people with diabetes included 502 people who inject insulin using a syringe or insulin pen to manage their diabetes. The survey of healthcare professionals included 301 healthcare professionals that treat people with diabetes that inject insulin, including 101 primary care physicians, 100 endocrinologists, and 100 diabetes educators. Physicians were recruited from the American Medical Association (AMA) physician list. Data from the patient and physician surveys were weighted as necessary to be representative of the respective populations. No estimates of theoretical sampling error can be calculated; a full methodology is available. The Injection Impact Report Survey was funded by an educational grant from Patton Medical Devices.
 
     
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